30 March 1901

THE DIESEL ENGINE AT GUIDE BRIDGE
The first exhibition of the Diesel engine at work in England was made on Monday afternoon at the engineering establishment of Messrs SCOTT and HODGSON close to Guide Bridge Station. The demonstration took place with a 20 to 22 horsepower engine which was subjected to severe tests before a large and critical gathering of experts, about 130 in all, who had journeyed from London by a special saloon train. Amongst them was Professor W G UNWIN who is probably the best authority in England on this particular branch of mechanics.

Whilst the inspection was going on, the engine was working at a pressure of 550lbs to the square inch, but is capable of being worked at 750lbs. The heavier the load, the greater the pressure required and vice versa.

The engine has been invented with the object of demonstrating the theory propounded a few years ago by Mr R DIESEL of Munich, that steam, oil and gas engines in their present form have reached the limits of possible improvements. Messrs SCOTT and HODGSON have constructed the engine to the order of the company which has been founded to take over the English patent for the inventor.


VIOLENT WORKHOUSE INMATE AT ASHTON
Attempt to Stab the Taskmaster

At the Ashton Borough Police Court, an inmate of the Ashton Union Workhouse named William HIBBERT was in the dock charged with committing an assault upon Richard REYNOLDS, taskmaster at the Workhouse, also with disorderly behaviour on March 26th.

Richard REYNOLDS stated that on Tuesday, the inmates were assembled in the dining hall, preparatory to dinner, and the children were singing grace when the prisoner got up and began bawling and shouting. On finishing singing, he began again.

Witness told him they should not have such behaviour in the dining hall, where upon he started cursing. Witness got hold of him by the shoulder and tried to put him outside, but he got hold of a knife (produced) and made a lunge at him. With the assistance of Mr SHORE, the knife was taken from the prisoner and they got him outside the dining hall.

Prisoner: "Aw want t’ send for witnesses and see whether they tell t’ truth or not; that’s way t’ decide the thing correctly."

Magistrate’s Clerk: "What were you making a noise for?"

Prisoner: "Wi as to ate hash and aw war axing where t’ mate (meat) war and they said they would not have that noise — (Laughter in court).

Clerk: "I suppose this hash was the usual hash?"

Prisoner: "There’s never any mate in it; they said it wor a new diet."

The Presiding Magistrate: "You will be committed to prison for 14 days on each of the charges and then you will have an opportunity of trying another diet."


ALL THROUGH THE ORGAN
James POTTS was summoned for being drunk and disorderly in King-street, Dukinfield. "I had some drink," he said. "Because the organ started, the childer got agate o’ dancin’, and he (the officer) locked me up. I don’t plead guilty to disorderly, except dancin’ for the childer.

An officer stated that the defendant was drunk with a crowd of children around him. He told POTTS to go away, but he refused. Alderman BEELEY said: "POTTS, I don’t know how many times you have been here when I have been on the bench. You seem to be a regular attender.

Superintendent COOPER said the defendant was an intolerable nuisance. He was fined five times in 1899 and was dealt with leniently that time, being fined no more than 2s 6d. This time, he was fined 10s and costs, at which he said: "You’d better pension me off."


AWFULLY SUDDEN DEATH AT DUKINFIELD
The police have received information of the death of Harry LLOYD, aged 23, dry cleaner, residing at 23, Malpas-street, Dukinfield which took place on Thursday evening very suddenly. The deceased was employed at the dry and cleaning works of Mr J T HOLDERNESS, Tame Valley, and he attended to his work in apparently his usual health. He was in the act of leaving the room where he worked and when in the doorway, he was seen to fall suddenly forward upon his face.

His fellow workmen were speedily at his side and lifted him up. It is said that the deceased gasped or coughed twice and died before medical aid could be obtained. Death was supposed to be due to sudden failure of the heart’s action.

Evidence was given by William LORD of 115 Park-road and Christopher BARKHAM of 63 Crescent-road. Dr CLARKE said of the deceased: Nothing unusual had occurred in the works that day to excite him. He was about his usual stamp and did not show any signs of fatigue. He was not running when he fell. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes.


ASHTON WOMAN FOUND DEAD IN BED
Sarah COWLEY, single woman, 72 years of age, was found dead in bed at her home, 33 William-street, Ashton on Saturday morning. Deceased was always strong and healthy, and her sudden demise came as a surprise. She retired to bed at nine o’clock on Friday night and made no complaint of feeling unwell. It was her custom to remain in bed longer than usual on Saturday mornings, but as she did not get up, her brother went upstairs at 11.30 am to waken her and found her dead in bed with her arms folded.

Evidence was given by the deceased’s sister-in-law, Sarah COWLEY of the same address and Alice CHORLTON of 110 Victoria-street, They said she was always in good health, although she was "very stout". It was four years since she had seen a doctor and she had cleaned at the Ashton police office for 50 years, never having been off through illness. She had been employed under three chief constables. A verdict of death from natural causes was returned.


SERIOUS FIRE AT GORTON
An alarming outbreak of fire occurred about half past three o’clock on Thursday afternoon in Cross-street. In the house adjoining Mr DUTTON’s drapery establishment dwelt Mr Isaac McEWAN, a blind man, and his wife. He was also the tenant of the next house as he carried on the business of a broker and second-hand furniture dealer and used the tenement as a shop or stores. It was in this that the fire started.

Mr and Mrs McEWAN had gone out for the afternoon and consequently were away when the fire was discovered. It gained strength with alarming rapidity. Mr Fred QUARMBY who was on business on the street ran to the Town Hall and sent a telephone message to the Manchester Fire Brigade. Councillor Edward SCULLY, whose place of business is not far from the house that was on fire also ran to the Town’s Building, summoned the men who were at work in the yard, and they got the hose and stand pipe belonging to the township, hailed a cab that happened to be passing, and drove rapidly to the scene.

The men got to work with commendable speed and worked with a will, assisted be several onlookers. By this time, the interior of the house was one mass of flames and it leaped through the windows into the street in a threatening and alarming manner. There was a strong wind blowing towards Wellington-street and the flames were sent in that direction.

At nine minutes to four o’clock a tender from the Upton-street (Longsight) Fire Station came tearing up at a tremendous speed. The driver said they did not get the call until 15 minutes to 4. At six o’clock, Mr and Mrs McEWAN had not returned to their ruined home and it is not known whether or not the premises and their contents were insured.


THE EDUCATION OF A DEAF MUTE
The Clerk read a communication from the Board of Education regarding Jane CHAPMAN, a deaf mute residing at Kob-lane asking what steps the Council were going to take with regard to her education. The sanction of the Board should be obtained to any contribution to a certified school under the Act.

The Chairman, Mr LEES said she was a rather weakly girl and was at present receiving instruction to a considerable extent. The Attendance Committee did not think it was wise that she should be sent to a certified school in her present state of health.


ACCIDENT
On Saturday last, John HADFIELD of Rider Bank, Chinley, was working at Messrs J J HADFIELD’s bleachworks when his hand got caught in the machinery and badly injured. The last we heard of the case, the youth was doing well as could be expected.

COMMENT ON THE CENSUS
Throughout the country, a vast army of enumerators has been engaged during the week, delivering census papers, or schedules, as they are officially called, amongst householders in every rank of life, and these will be collected as far as possible on Monday next.

The distribution of the papers is a comparatively easy matter. It is the collection that the enumerators may be expected to find the real difficulty of their work. There will be incomplete and inaccurate returns to make right and a vast amount of ignorance and prejudice to overcome in some of the poor districts before the enumerators can hand in their papers to the registrar, Mr Percy BRIERLEY.

Householders will greatly facilitate matters and assist the accomplishment of a correct census if they will, before filling up their schedule, carefully study the five examples which appear on the back of each. It is required that the precise occupations of every person enumerated must be given in the minutest detail and vague terms such as contractor, manager, foreman, dealer, mechanic, machine worker, weaver, spinner, labourer and the like, must not be used alone.

They should clearly state, for instance, that their occupation is that of "cotton" or "woollen" weaver, an "operative" cotton weaver, "outdoor" or "ironworks" labourer, "mill" mechanic, "boilerworks" foreman, "provision" dealer, "sewing" machine worker, "mill" manager, "public works" contractor &c. On these points, the requirements of the Registrar General are most searching.


DEPARTURE OF ASHTON VOLUNTEERS FOR THE FRONT
Enthusiastic Scenes

Ashton people were early awake on Saturday morning bent on witnessing the departure of the local volunteers for the front and to give them a hearty send-off. By 7 o’clock crowds were wending their way in the direction of Charlestown Station from which point the local detachment were timed to make their departure at 7.50 am. The names of the selected volunteers were:

Captain G LUPTON, Sergeant H SHELDON, Corporals E EATON and W E SAXON, Lance-Corporal S BOOTH, Bugler J S STRINGER, Privates H GREAVES, J OULTON, F ROGERS, W ROBINSON, P H WILLIAMSON, J WALKER, A JONES, A BROWN, T BOWDEN, W HIBBERT, R HADFIELD, J W SMITH, A S HOLT, C BOARDMAN, H ELLISON, A MARLAND, F GORLE, R MARTIN, G HACKLEY, J H LEES, S ROWBOTTOM, A LEONARD, W H PRIESTLEY, V R CHADWICK, R ALTHORPE, W H GRANT, P MANGNALL, F HULLEY and J W MARLAND.

On the previous Wednesday night, the Volunteers were given a farewell and toasted in a right handsome manner at the George and Dragon Hotel.

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